Archives for the month of: April, 2015

“Being able to see on a daily basis … creation and order in how the food chain works, I think that’s my favourite part [of fishing],” says Cindi John. She and her husband and partner Ed are part of the Ottawa-Chippewa tribe in NW Michigan, fishing with historic treaty rights on Lake Michigan. Jason Kohl’s film 80 to 90 Ft is a gentle portrait of their work and perceptions of how it is changing, much due to climate change, in terms of water temperature and the depths at which fish swim, invasive species, and numbers caught.

What a funny, anxious moment in ecological history, to perceive intellectually and experientially the massive changes happening in the natural world, and to know that things are just going to keep getting weirder. “I don’t know what the state of the fishery is going to be like in five or ten years, there are certain things I don’t have control over, so we just play it by ear, I guess,” says Ed John with wry wisdom.

I wanted to share this film on my blog for various reasons, which are interrelated. Read the rest of this entry »

Just watched this video on a wonderful blog Frequent Found Growing on Disturbed Ground, which includes a verse from the Tao Te Ching that gave me goosebumps.  Frank Cook was a profound and incredibly knowledgable, powerful man, and it’s a gift of technology that he can still speak to us through it’s workings.  This is another site on which to learn about him, and revel in his life.

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At table top sales… car boot sales … small community events, one still encounters a kind of selling of traditional home-made preserves.  It doesn’t call itself “local food” or “artisan” but it is both, and it’ll be sad if this practice dies out, or becomes something fancified, and less small-scale.  I also love the re-using of jars.   Read the rest of this entry »

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Those cute Passover confections are not my creations. They were born in the kitchen of a friend whose creativity and active spiritual questioning manifest in her culinary arts.  I’m often trying to lure her into “guest blogging” here on KitchenCounterCulture, but this time I asked if I could do a post-from-afar in lieu of anything Pesach-related of my own… So here we have Macaroons for Passover in her unique but inspirational style of “Intuitive Cooking,” from which I have much to learn.  …And want to share with readers as well.  Thank you Jess! Read the rest of this entry »

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